Pathway to College: Steps to Take to Make the Dream a Reality

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Pathway to College: Steps to Take to Make the Dream a Reality

Kamryn Manley, Bryce Pearrow and Jenna Najera sport their college shirts.

Kamryn Manley, Bryce Pearrow and Jenna Najera sport their college shirts.

Kamryn Manley, Bryce Pearrow and Jenna Najera sport their college shirts.

Kamryn Manley, Bryce Pearrow and Jenna Najera sport their college shirts.

Camryn Mikosh, Journalism Student

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As deadlines loom closer and senioritis sets in, tired seniors everywhere scurry to finish their essays, fill in applications and try to squeeze in one last SAT. With empty bank accounts and a healthy amount of anticipation and anxiety, the seniors send in their applications with hopes of attending their dream college.

To most the process of applying to college is a daunting task, but seniors Kamryn Manley, Bryce Pearrow and Jenna Najera have prepared their college application and toured their colleges. Now they wait in anticipation for graduation as they walk on their paths to college.

“I was checking my email frantically, and then I refreshed, and it popped up,” Najera said. “I immediately called my mom, and I was like ‘guess what?’”

Everyone knows the first step towards college is applying. Most applications are the same, but not everyone prepares their applications similarly.

“I started working on my essays early in my junior year,” Manley said. “I took my SATs and ACTs to get good scores, and I visited a bunch of colleges to find out where I fit.”

Manley’s approach is pretty typical of high school students. Whereas other students put even more on their applications to boost themselves.

“I participated in a lot of extracurricular activities, like leadership positions,” Najera said. “I got awards in some of those so I made sure to make a resume. I kind of just recapped what I did in high school.”

The process of completing multiple applications and turning them in before it’s too late can be a daunting task. However, there are different ways to help finish this process.

“It was kind of a pain,” Pearrow said. “Different schools have different requirements. For out of state, I had to use a different application than I did for Texas schools. So it was kind of tricky in that aspect. They required different essays, so it varies from school to school.”

After all of the work put in and the acceptance emails and letters start rolling in, the payoff is great.

“I was at home,” Manley said. “When it was Angelo, I got my letter, and it’s so cool. You pull out a little banner, and you open it up and all of this glitter falls out. My mom was so mad; it was all over the kitchen floor. I had a major freak-out moment.”

After acceptance to college there comes the financial questions. Most high schoolers look into scholarships as soon as they choose where they are going.

“I have gotten merit scholarships from UNT and Belmont,” Najera said. “I’m applying to some [scholarships]. There’s even more essays. It’s basically like a college application. You just have to know your resume and things you’ve been a part of. Just be able to talk about yourself.”

After being accepted and granted scholarships, a healthy amount of excitement sets in. High schoolers wait in anticipation to finish high school and become a part of the real world.

“I’m just excited to move forward with life and not be stuck in high school,” Najera said. “I excited to start jumping into actually doing stuff.”

Most high schoolers are excited but being afraid or nervous is healthy. This big step forward into the real world, and into life, can be daunting.

“I guess I’m just really excited for the possibility and the experience,” Manley said. “I have all these hopes of what the experience can be, and what it will be, and I’m just hoping it is what it is. At the same time, I have all of these fears that it could go the other way.”